A "Maasai-ive" Welcome

Photo-on-2013-08-24-at-19.39.jpg
Mathew paints the outside of the main dormitory of the KRCH.

Mathew paints the outside of the main dormitory of the KRCH.

Last night I had a dream. I was back at home in Connecticut and very sad I wasn't in Kenya. I was even crying at home, wanting to go back. So when I woke up, looked around, and realized where I was, I instantly became joyful. The joy, however, ended very quickly when I realized the real reason I woke up. A swarm of safari ants had invaded the house in which I was sleeping. Thousands and thousands of them...the ground was black and moving. The reason? A few avacado peels left in the dirt. Safari ants bite hard and everyone was feeling their wrath. The other children and I jumped out of our blankets on the ground with screams and chased the ants away. Within minutes they were gone, but their 2:45am visit left bite marks on everyone.

Everything at home has been great. The boys and girls are in school and the former street children are improving everyday. Volunteer Mathew Lloyd has been helping around the house and at a local secondary school as well. Our biggest project is making an Arrive movie, which will be coming out in the next few weeks (stay tuned). 

I would also like everyone to welcome our newest child, Debora. Debora (pronounced de-BORE-a) is a Maasai girl who has lived a very hard life. Her mother had her out of wedlock, and one day when she was very young, went to a corn field, left Debora in the middle of the field, and then ran. Nobody has seen her since. Debora's grandmother and aunt accompanied her on the three-hour bus ride to Keumbu. They stayed the night and then parted ways with Debora the next day.

From left: Debora's aunt, Debora's grandmother, and Debora. This is the first time Debora's grandmother had seen a computer (photo is from Photo Booth on my laptop), and the last picture the three had together before they parted ways (of course, they will meet again).

From left: Debora's aunt, Debora's grandmother, and Debora. This is the first time Debora's grandmother had seen a computer (photo is from Photo Booth on my laptop), and the last picture the three had together before they parted ways (of course, they will meet again).

Since then (about a week ago), Debora has become a staple at home. Whether she is explaining Maasai culture, teaching the other girls how to dance, giving lessons of Kimaasai (the Maasai language) in school, or singing (she has an extrodinary voice), Debora now calls the Keumbu Rehema Children's Home, "home."

Tonight is as well an exciting night at home. After searching long and hard, I have found the Lion King (in English), and the Lion King 2 and Lion King 3 (in Swahili). It is only right that all of the kids here see Lion King, and I never mind watching the movie again. So I must go to sing Circle of Life and try to follow the sequels in Swahili. Wish me luck!